How to raise funds for charity

Y DES FEMMES DeFI CARIATIF BANQUE SCOTIA

Photo: YWCA Montreal team at Scotiabank Charity Challenge / Défi Caritatif Montreal 2015

I used to think that 13 was an unlucky number, but I changed my mind a few years ago.  A brand awareness survey found that 13% of non-client respondents were likely to do business with our company because it sponsored community events and charities they cared about.

Our corporate marketing team got lucky because the 13% result surpassed expectations, justified budget renewal and provided proof that our corporate philanthropy program benefited business goals.

According to Imagine Canada, a national charitable organization that represents the charitable sector, charities and non-profits receive around $2.8 billion from corporations.  The majority of corporations contribute to charities because they understand that healthy communities are good for business.

But corporate philanthropy is becoming more challenging.  And many of the more than 150,000 charitable organizations in Canada are down on their luck.

Thirty-eight percent of companies said that too many charities are trying to solicit money for the same cause.  Traditional cheque book philanthropy is rapidly being replaced by strategic partnerships that benefit both the community and corporate donors.

With shrinking government funding, charities are challenged to find the best way of raising funds from corporate and individual donors.   But this presents an opportunity for charities to find unique and creative ways to raise the funds needed for survival.

How to raise funds for charity?  Help corporations to be successful

A few suggestions that charitable organizations may want to consider…

Pride of association

Charitable organizations can support business by bringing together donors at in-person events to raise funds and network.  Out of this comes pride of association with like-minded peers who share the same concerns and commitment to the charitable cause.

  • A good example is the United Way of Ottawa’s GenNEXT Giving Circle.  United Way organizes networking and fundraising events and initiatives where young people can learn about the needs in their community, volunteer their time, and put their dollars to work where they will have the greatest impact.

Shared community of buyers and donors

Charitable organizations can also support client engagement and expand the number of clients for corporations.  By creating strategic partnerships charities and corporations can launch major events to promote products and build public awareness of the charity’s cause, with the intention of building a shared community of donors and clients.

  • A few years ago, The Salvation Army partnered with Montreal-based designers and staged a fashion show to raise funds for L’Abri d’espoir, a shelter for abused women and their children. The event was used to leverage the brands of the charity and of the fashion designers to create a shared community of buyers and donors who support the cause of protecting women from violence.   

Community and employee engagement

Apart from soliciting donations from corporations who care about their causes, charitable organizations should also ask corporations to volunteer their expertise.  Charitable organizations can organize employee volunteer activities that support employee engagement and strengthen teamwork.

  • According to Volunteer Canada, employer-supported volunteering (ESV) is emerging as a regular practice among many of today’s employers seeking to give back to the community. ESV activities and programs are a new “shared value” approach, helping businesses strengthen community relationships and improve employee engagement. They also give non-profits access to new resources and skills while allowing employees to refine and enhance their skills and expand their networks.

Sharing information for thought leadership

Charitable organizations are well-placed to provide valuable data and insights on the causes they advocate and the services they provide.  This information can be shared with thought leaders and persons of influence who have access to the podiums at thought leadership events.    Many chambers of commerce and think tanks host events attended by the audiences that are likely to become interested in the charitable organizations’ causes.  Through thought leadership, corporations can increase their reputation as experts in a particular industry or as key contributors to the quest for solutions in fields such as healthcare and economic development.

Adopt business practices

Although well-intentioned tactics can be used to solicit financial support, charities cannot rely on luck and goodwill.

The common element in all of these suggestions is the creation of relationships with the aim of engaging corporations in committed partnerships that lead to sustained support for charitable organizations.

Like for-profit corporations, charitable organizations must adopt business practices to increase awareness by creating differentiated messages and developing relationships that provide a mutual exchange of benefits.  This requires deliberate planning with the aim of achieving specific outcomes that are good for charities, businesses and communities.

Christ in you, the hope of glory!  That’s why glory matters.

www.camilleisaacsmorell.com

www.twitter.com/glorymatters 

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There is Enough for all of Us: My Views on Persistent Poverty, the Prosperity Gospel and Social Justice

Karen's mountains

It was in the dimming sunlight of dusk that I had a moment of enlightenment.

I was late for an appointment but lucky enough to find a parking space on a crowded street. Even though I had enough money to pay for the thirty minutes I needed, I didn’t have the right coins to put in the parking meter.  There were no shops nearby to ask for change, only people scurrying by.

Bewildered and frantic, I rushed up to a couple and asked if they could exchange my dimes and nickels for two quarters.

“Sorry,” he said, as I felt my racing heart sink.

“But here’s my receipt for forty minutes remaining on my space in the parking lot over there,” he continued.

“How much do I owe you for that?” I asked in disbelief.

“Nothing.  Please take it.  I’m sure you need it more than we do,” he responded.

In that instant, as I saw the remaining rays of sunset slide below the horizon, I could feel my heart warm with gratitude for Divine Providence.  I got more than I asked for, unexpectedly and right on time.

But my “aha moment” didn’t end there.

I made it to my appointment, but the person who I was to meet didn’t show up and my meeting was postponed to another day.  I chose not to be disappointed.

My takeaway from all this was that we can get more, even when we don’t need it as there is an inexhaustible supply of everything we need in the Universe!

There is ample evidence that there is more than enough for everyone in this world.

Abundance is more of a problem than scarcity

Oxfam reported that there is enough food to feed the world.  In fact the world produces 17% more food per person today than 30 years ago. The International Federation of the Red Cross reported in 2011 that there are 1.5 billion people worldwide classified as obese.  However, 925 million go to sleep hungry every night.  I can accept that nutrient-poor foods may be the main contributor to obesity.  The truth is that there is more food available in the world than we are led to believe. There is enough and more for everyone. The problem is the inequitable distribution of wealth.

Poverty is being alleviated, but…

The United Nations reports that the international community has made significant strides towards lifting people out of poverty, with extreme poverty rates cut in half since 1990.  However, the poorest 40 percent of the world’s population accounts for 5 percent of global income and the richest 20 percent accounts for three-quarters of world income.

Persistent poverty is real.  Breaking generational cycles of poverty continues to be elusive.

The divide between those who have more and those who have less or nothing at all is widening. This is happening in spite of the myriad people, initiatives and organizations undertaking projects to alleviate poverty.  Throughout the year, I receive all kinds of requests for donations ranging from money to build vital infrastructure to gifts in kind such as food, clothing and Christmas gifts.

Giving the excess from those who have to those who don’t have, doesn’t always bridge the divide

There are many willing volunteers who want to help, but they lack the knowledge and skills required to be effective. I’ve heard stories about water wells that don’t work after the foreign aid workers have left; poorly built walls that have to be redone; and gift toys that children have no clue about how to use.

Too often the gifts and donations of the “haves” do not empower the “have nots.”   

A constant stream of donations disempowers people and creates dependency on others.  In my own experience, most people in need want to develop their talents, find sustainable employment and become self-sufficient to support their families.

None of this darkens the revelations of my “aha moment.”

Religious teachings about prosperity

Some Christian religious denominations glorify poverty as an honourable spiritual and material state that is sanctified by God.  There are others who teach a “prosperity gospel,” claiming that excessive financial wealth and excellent health are always in the will of God.

I don’t find either of these approaches to be satisfactory as they can be used to oppress people in one way or another.

On one hand, glorifying poverty leads people to passively accept poverty and deprives them of the opportunity to make the required effort to achieve financial independence and a better standard of living. On the other hand, those who do not achieve financial success or are in ill-health may be led to believe that they are inadequate, sinful or not following God’s will.

While I don’t believe that God intends anyone to live in poverty and that there is nothing inherently wrong with wanting to have as much as we want and more, I believe that social justice has to be the guiding principle in the quest for personal and collective prosperity.

Social justice bridges poverty to prosperity

The inexhaustible resources of the Universe are available to all of us. It’s our commitment to social justice that will bridge the divide between poverty and prosperity.  Just like the man who offered me the parking receipt with the excess time he didn’t need, we should always think of ways in which we can use what we have and don’t need more of, to enable and empower others to get to a better place.

Christ in you, the hope of glory.  That’s why glory matters!

@glorymatters

www.camilleisaacsmorell.com